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December 09, 2018, 10:54:11 PM

Author Topic: hydro dipping question  (Read 319 times)

Offline lupint2t

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hydro dipping question
« on: January 11, 2017, 12:26:23 AM »
Any of you guys ever had a rifle hydro dipped? I want to get my ugly american stock done but not sure where to send it. I've emailed a couple places I found on google and on responses. Wondering if it's worth the price to have stock, barrel, rings, and scope all dipped(rifle only cost me 320$).
 

Offline tornadochaser

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Re: hydro dipping question
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2017, 09:31:55 AM »
I'd buy a duracoat kit for $30 personally...but dipping around here isn't cheap.
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Offline troy_v

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Re: hydro dipping question
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2017, 02:16:50 PM »
I'd buy a duracoat kit for $30 personally...but dipping around here isn't cheap.

I agree. Get the "Duracoat Aerosol can in a can" kit.

I've had things hydrodipped in the past and I have not been happy. It's not durable at all, and the pattern will look "stretched/skewed" in places.
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Offline lupint2t

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Re: hydro dipping question
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2017, 05:03:42 PM »
I'd buy a duracoat kit for $30 personally...but dipping around here isn't cheap.

I agree. Get the "Duracoat Aerosol can in a can" kit.

I've had things hydrodipped in the past and I have not been happy. It's not durable at all, and the pattern will look "stretched/skewed" in places.

Have you used the kit before? Does the Preval kit require baking and is it enough for a whole firearm? I see the aerosol cans come in single colors or the preval kit comes with everything for camo pattern.  Interested in doing it in a camo if its something my zero artistic abilities can accomplish.
 

Offline troy_v

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Re: hydro dipping question
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2017, 12:07:29 AM »

Have you used the kit before? Does the Preval kit require baking and is it enough for a whole firearm? I see the aerosol cans come in single colors or the preval kit comes with everything for camo pattern.  Interested in doing it in a camo if its something my zero artistic abilities can accomplish.

This is the kit I recommend if you do not have an airbrush. http://www.lauerweaponry.com/?fuseaction=category.display&category_ID=1065  I have used this to paint over a dozen rifles. It's far better than regular Krylon or Rustoleum, and way better still than AlumaHydeII.

Just don't buy the Duracoat "Shake and Spray" kits - those do not work well.

As for the camo thing, you'll need to buy a bunch of different colors. That will get a bit pricey. Also keep in mind that once you release the hardener into the rest of the can, you have 24 hours to use it.

Oven baking Duracoat is not necessary, but I do bake mine in the oven (170 degrees for 3 hours) - doing so accelerates the drying process considerably.
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Offline troy_v

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Re: hydro dipping question
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2017, 12:13:37 AM »
Here's a few pictures I took while using the Duracoat Aerosol in Wolf Grey on a 10.5" pistol I built.


(Note: the key to a successful project like this is to THOROUGHLY degrease everything, then tape off all the areas you don't want to paint)












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Offline lupint2t

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Re: hydro dipping question
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2017, 12:15:24 AM »

Have you used the kit before? Does the Preval kit require baking and is it enough for a whole firearm? I see the aerosol cans come in single colors or the preval kit comes with everything for camo pattern.  Interested in doing it in a camo if its something my zero artistic abilities can accomplish.

This is the kit I recommend if you do not have an airbrush. http://www.lauerweaponry.com/?fuseaction=category.display&category_ID=1065  I have used this to paint over a dozen rifles. It's far better than regular Krylon or Rustoleum, and way better still than AlumaHydeII.

Just don't buy the Duracoat "Shake and Spray" kits - those do not work well.

As for the camo thing, you'll need to buy a bunch of different colors. That will get a bit pricey. Also keep in mind that once you release the hardener into the rest of the can, you have 24 hours to use it.

Oven baking Duracoat is not necessary, but I do bake mine in the oven (170 degrees for 3 hours) - doing so accelerates the drying process considerably.

Thank you, I may end up just doing the whole thing in a dark brown. I've been reading threads over at arf in the refinishing section and watching some youtube vids. Will post back in a week or two with some results. Gonna do it one way or another just not decided if straight color or attempt a simple camo.
 

Offline tornadochaser

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Re: hydro dipping question
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2017, 09:01:11 AM »
The guns I have duracoated, I've always done two-color.  black and some sort of brown or grey.  For example, an 870 I did, I left the foregrip and stock as the factory black color, duracoated the bolt, trigger, and pins black, and did the trigger guard, receiver, barrel, magazine, and magazine extension as coyote brown.
The only two things you should mix good whiskey with is ice and questionable decisions.